Interestingly, the celebrations of the Rakshabandhan festival, or to put it simply ‘Rakhi’, have produced some captivating instances where Indian masses have stepped up their celebrations to include their surroundings into the festivities. Especially, women coming together in flocks to tie the rakhis on the wrists of soldiers deployed in various parts of the country was the highlight of the festival.

In the capital city of Punjab, Amritsar, women celebrated the day by knotting rakhis to the wrist of BSF personnel, reported ANI.

 

Elsewhere, two young girls from the Udhampur district of Jammu and Kashmir resorted to making rakhis at home boycotting the ‘made in China’ Rakhis.

“Most rakhis are ‘Made in China’ and we did not want to buy them. So, we decided to make Rakhis at home, it was fun filled & creative”, Minarwa, one of the two young girls were quoted as saying.

The eccentric Rakshabandhan celebrations continued with tribal women from a village near Jamshedpur tying rakhis to trees pledging to protect them. The love-filled gesture went viral on social media site Twitter with people acknowledging and lauding the step taken by the women of the village to protect the environment.     

Like in Jammu and Kashmir, school girls from Udhampur district came forward to celebrate Rakshabandhan with Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) soldiers, on Sunday. 

These young souls took an initiative to go ahead and tie rakhis on the wrists of CRPF men deployed for the security of Amarnath Yatra.

The word Rakshabandhan essentially means the ‘bond of protection’, the festival is celebrated and cherished in the whole of India. Being a festival of Hindus originally, the occasion is yet celebrated largely among various religions, sects, cultures and so on.

In another happenings, nursery school children in the Northeastern state of Tripura marked the auspicious day by tying rakhi to the wrist of Tripura CM Manik Sarkar.

Rakshabandhan is known by different names within different communities across the Indian subcontinent. It is an ancient Hindu festival that ritually celebrates the love and duty between brothers and sisters. Usually, the sister performs a Rakhi ceremony then prays to express her love and also wishes for the prosperity of her brother, in return the brother pledges to protect her sister.