Tamil Nadu to make Tamil a compulsory subject for boards

| Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 12:55
First Published |
Tamil Nadu

In a move that’s definitely raised some eyebrows, the Tamil Nadu government has made Tamil compulsory for students of Class X. Not only will the subject be compulsory in class but it will also be compulsory during the crucial Class X board exams.
While linguistic minorities in the state have got a temporary exemption from the test, questions are being raised as to how equipped the state’s education system is to be able to impart Tamil education on such a massive scale.
For a state that once fought against the imposition of Hindi on its people, the question is being raised as to whether it is right to impose Tamil on Tamil Nadu’s immigrants.
(Also Read: Tamil Nadu presents Rs 9,154.78 crore deficit interim budget)
In 2006-2008, a rule was brought in, in which there were three paths in which a student could study, that is English, Tamil or the child’s mother tongue. In 2013, school management approached the court saying that there are too many languages to be taught in the same school and not enough resources to finish the course. The court took cognizance of this matter and this is what is leading to the changes in the education system in Tamil Nadu.


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Articles is hiding facts about Hindi imposition

THis article is biased and actually either lying or hiding the truth. In Tamil Nadu's CBSE schools Hindi remains an imposed language. Tamil Nadu was the last state to have the state official language as a compulsory language, Maharashtra has been having Marathi compulsory several years before. It seems that by hiding the truth, author is probably supporting Hindi imposition across India. Hindi imposition is India's darkest policy ever since British handover the administration to Indians. The country's government supported by the Private Sector appears to be hellbent on removing its heritage languages and replacing it with a language whose origin is actually from outside India (actually from Persia) - this is reflected by the absence of Indian languages in toll free numbers of majoritity of companies and inability to choose native language. This news article appears to be portraying sole beneficiaries of the language policies as victims.

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