Beware of violence-prone inter-communal tension in Gujarat, while in Goa be warned of spiked drinks, the latest advisory for British tourists to India has cautioned.

The advisory issued by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on Tuesday also asks tourists, especially women travellers to respect local customs and dresses, as well as avoid visiting remote and unlit beaches after dark.

In its advisory for the Western Indian region, the advisory asks tourists to stay away from the India-Pakistan border, while also suggesting caution while travelling within Gujarat.

“There continues to be some inter communal tension in Gujarat which can lead to isolated incidents of violence,” the advisory states.

Commenting about Goa, one of the most favourite beach tourism destinations for tourists from Britain, the advisory states that “there have been a few serious incidents involving British nationals, most recently the murder of a young female traveller in March 2017”.

“You should observe and respect local dress and customs. Take particular care of your bags and purses and avoid unlit and remote beaches after dark. Keep your passport and other valuables safe,” the advisory states.

“Don’t leave your drinks unattended. There have been reports of drinks being spiked and travellers, including British nationals, subsequently being robbed or assaulted,” it adds.

Cautioning tourists against swimming in the sea, on account of strong currents, the advisory asks tourists to follow warnings posted on beaches and instructions issued by lifeguards.

“Every year several people drown due to the strong currents in the sea. Emergency service standards may differ from those in the UK,” it says.

“Road traffic accidents are common and many fatal accidents occur each year. Wear a good quality helmet if renting a motorcycle or scooter,” the advisory also says.

For those tourists keen on a shopping spree, the advisory warns against confidence tricksters preying on foreign tourists.

“Be wary of confidence tricksters, particularly in Goa, Agra and Jaipur, who promise large amounts of cash for delivery of jewellery abroad in return for an initial deposit. The jewellery is worthless and the deposit, often amounting to thousands of pounds, is lost,” the advisory says.