In a much-anticipated development that is slated to have serious implications, the Pakistan Supreme Court on Friday will announce the verdict in Panama Papers case against Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and his family.

Speaking to the media, the registrar of the apex court said that a five-judge bench headed by Justice Asif Saeed Khosa will be delivering the decision at 11.30 AM. Notably, the decision was reserved on the last hearing on July 21.

Earlier this month, the Joint Investigation Team (JIT) which probed the Panama Papers case against Nawaz Sharif’s family assets had recommended reopening 15 cases against Sharif.

Of these 15 cases, three were registered during the 1994 and 2011 tenures of the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) and 12 during President Pervez Musharraf regime, soon after he toppled the Sharif government in the October 1999 military coup, reports Dawn News.

The case regarding the Sharif family’s four London apartments was also among the investigations started by the National Accountability Bureau (NAB) in December 1999.

In its April 20 verdict, the Supreme Court asked the JIT to investigate the money trail for the London flats, Dawn News reported.

The JIT noted “that these (15) cases have also been quashed without conducting a proper trial and without giving evidence a chance to come on record”.

The probe team also recommended the NAB be complete its investigation into the London properties.

On July 10, a three-judge bench of the Supreme Court began examining a report submitted by the JIT over the money laundering allegations.

The bench, after examination of the report, asked for transcripts of all speeches made in the last 60 days by Sharif’s party leaders, presumably to examine them for contemptuous content.

The Prime Minister’s family was named in the Panama Papers, which comprised 11.5 million documents, showing how some of the world’s most powerful people secreted away their money in offshore holdings.

Reportedly, the JIT reportedly recommended Sharif’s disqualification to the apex court earlier this month.