New Study Reveals Men Likelier To Die Early From COVID-19 Than Women

While men were disproportionately impacted by Covid-19 worldwide, the disparity was most pronounced in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Besides Covid-19, cardiovascular disease and road injuries also significantly contribute to premature deaths, affecting both genders. Read on for more

A recent study unveils notable distinctions between men and women concerning health issues and risks. Men confront a heightened risk of premature death from conditions like Covid-19, heart disease, and road accidents. Conversely, women tend to encounter more non-fatal illnesses such as mental health conditions and headaches.

Researchers, sharing their discoveries in The Lancet Public Health journal, examined data spanning the past three decades to comprehend the evolution of these health gaps across different regions. Their analysis revealed that men lost 45% more years of life to Covid-19 compared to women. Covid-19 emerged as the primary cause of health loss in 2021.

One of the most significant disparities favouring women was evident in cases of low back pain, notably in regions like South Asia and parts of Europe and Asia. These differences manifest in adolescence and persist throughout life, with women grappling with higher levels of illness and disability overall due to their longer life expectancy.

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What Does The New Study Say?

“Overall, Covid-19 was the leading cause of health loss in 2021, with males experiencing 45% more health loss from Covid-19 than females (3,978 vs 2,211 age-standardised Disability-Adjusted Life Years per 100,000),” wrote the authors.

To mitigate these disparities, researchers underscored the importance of tailored strategies acknowledging the unique health challenges faced by both men and women. They advocated for nations to gather and utilize sex and gender-specific data to enhance health policies and interventions.

Luisa Sorio Flor, the senior author of the study, emphasized the significance of comprehending how sex differences influence health outcomes, particularly underscored by the Covid-19 pandemic.

While men were disproportionately impacted by Covid-19 worldwide, the disparity was most pronounced in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Besides Covid-19, cardiovascular disease and road injuries also significantly contribute to premature deaths, affecting both genders.

Mental health conditions, notably depressive disorders, also exact a heavier toll on women, with the widest gaps observed in high-income countries and parts of Latin America and the Caribbean. The study serves as a reminder of the imperative to address gender disparities in health and underscores the necessity for concerted efforts to promote health equity for all.