Rep from 90 nations join hands to revive Modern Pythian Games

29 September, 2022 | Pranay Lad

Modern Pythian Games Headlines

The formation of the International Pythian Council and participation in the revival of the Delphian idea of the “Modern Pythian Games” in front of the world’s media today at the H...

The formation of the International Pythian Council and participation in the revival of the Delphian idea of the “Modern Pythian Games” in front of the world’s media today at the Hotel Le Meridian in New Delhi marked a historic day for the Modern Pythian Games. Participants from more than 90 countries included Royal Majesties, Ambassadors, businesspeople, cultural organisations, and artisans.

The International Pythian Council and Delphic India Trust, who control the rights to the “Modern Pythian Games,” were founded by Bijender Goel. He created the concept for Pythian games, spoke at the press conference, and explained the philosophy behind this game. He claimed that from 582 B.C., the Pythian Games had been a component of the Pan Hellenic Games in ancient Greece. They were the second-most significant event after the Olympics before all Pan Hellenic games were abandoned in 394 A.D.

The Modern Pythian Games will be conducted every four years and, thanks to its multidimensional structure and support for national economies, tourism, and the creation of jobs for craftsmen and other stakeholders, they will inspire fresh optimism.

These video games will act as a single, worldwide hub for the thriving trade of martial arts, e-sports, traditional arts, adventure, entertainment, and video games. These competitions will play a significant role in fostering international understanding through cultural diplomacy. This will also be a significant step toward the organisation of the 800-billion-euro creative economy.

According to Prime Minister Narendra Modi, “The feelings for craftsmen are converting into a worldwide movement to help artisans” in his recent address “MANN KI BAAT”.

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