Covid-19 vaccine shortages have hindered India’s attempt to run a huge vaccination drive. In addition, the shortage of beds in the Urban and rural areas put additional pressure on the health infrastructure. Earlier, Central government announced the vaccination drive for above 18 will be started from May 1. However, Many states didn’t start this phase for the above 18 people due to the shortage of vaccines.

Many hospitals are denying to take more patients because of the shortages of beds and other medical facilities. In Bengaluru, Officials from Bengaluru’s civic body, the BBMP, have been accused of accepting bribes in exchange for the allocation of hospital beds reserved for Covid-19 patients. BJP MP Tejasvi Surya and other BJP MLAs discovered that BBMP officials were charging bribes to assign beds reserved under the government quota for Covid-19 patients in collusion with outside agents. Getting Beds on time has became a major challenge for a common man, Government needs to take this thing more seriously. Maharashtra is also experiencing the shortage of vaccines . However, when fresh supplies of 26.77 lakh vaccine doses were received by the state from the Centre on March 31 and distributed to Jalna district, which is home to Maharashtra Health Minister Rajesh Tope, received 60,000 vaccine doses more than its allotment of 17,000 doses.

India is now experiencing the second phase of the coronavirus pandemic. The health infrastructure is being strained as the number of cases continues to rise at the rapid pace. The Serum Institute’s chief executive, Adar Poonawalla said that India’s extreme shortage would last “for months,” most likely until July, because the government had not put orders in time and thus had not increased manufacturing capacity earlier.

Read More: Bed mafia blocking Covid-19 beds: Tejasvi Surya exposes BBMP bed scam

When new coronavirus cases declined, Poonawalla told The Financial Times that the authorities did not plan to face a second wave of the pandemic. “Everyone believed India was beginning to turn the tide on the pandemic,” he said.